Why Do Dogs Pee When Excited? And What Should You Know About It

Why Do Dogs Pee When Excited? And What Should You Know About It

Dog peeing when they’re excited is a pretty common occurrence. What is the reason behind this?


You might be surprised to hear that this strange behavior has an evolutionary origin. The urine of dogs is important for marking territory and finding food.


So, what does it mean when your dog pees when they're excited? It means your dog perceives you as a friendly and approachable human (or other animals).


This can be attributed to the fact that most people will pet or show affection towards their dogs when they are happy. This makes them feel safe and provides them with a sense of security.


Read on to learn more about why dogs pee when excited and how to prevent your dog from peeing in anticipation of something exciting happening.


Section 1: Why do dogs pee when they're excited? Section 2: What does it mean when your dog pees when they are excited? Section 3: How to respond to a dog that pees when they are excited Section 4: Does neutering help with excited peeing? Section 5: How do you stop a dog from peeing when excited?


Why do dogs pee when they're excited?


Although the peeing behavior of dogs is normal in most cases, the unusual use of urination, i.e. where it appears to be directed at you, may be seen as a sign of aggression or anxiety.


If you are feeling anxious around your dog, you might consider giving them a more relaxing environment.


You should not discipline your dog for what appears to be anxious behavior.


If your dog appears to be in severe anxiety or an aggressive state of mind, contact a professional.


What does it mean when your dog pees when they are excited?


It’s normal for your dog to pee when you talk to them or play with them. Their hormones will be activated.


Dogs in nature are called to be pack animals. As such, their highly developed social structure makes them used to doing things with others in their group.


As a result, they may not be able to express this expression of excitement in a way that's socially acceptable in a social setting.


The result of this is your dog’s potty behavior (peeing when they're excited).


Consequently, the response they get from you can be read as a form of affection.


This is particularly true for dogs that are very sociable and are not only adopted but also rehomed often.


However, you might not be sure about the importance of this peeing behavior.


How to respond to a dog that pees when they are excited


If you pet a dog when they are excited, you are encouraging them to continue. So, first, the dog will respond by getting closer to you to get the petting or attention that they crave.


This can lead to them peeing on you. In order to discourage this behavior, one way to do so is to stop the petting and turn your back on the dog.


Alternatively, your dog could just be in the "pee mode" and you can greet them while they are excited.


The Poo Lesson Although peeing while you're around your dog is a strange phenomenon that most people have never witnessed, it's important to remember that there are benefits to it.


Does neutering help with excited peeing?


There is evidence to suggest that neutering your dog might help with the symptoms of excited peeing.


The lack of hormones during neutering might mean that some dogs are less likely to be so excited when they urinate.


More neutered dogs would probably have less of an overactive hormone system in the bladder.


This is called hyperinflation (hyperhydrosis). They can urinate more often in a similar way to dogs that are happy.


How do you stop a dog from peeing when excited?


Rip up a water hose and give them a drink. Dogs hate water, but they will drink from a hose if it’s offered to them.


Dogger and friends would also be happy to enjoy a water hose fight. This will distract them from their urge to pee.


Give your dog a big treat. Dogs are very motivated by food.


This will give them something else to think about, and the chances of them peeing down will be reduced.


Change your potty training system. Rather than training dogs by getting them to sit and then walk with them to the potty, get them accustomed to relieving themselves inside.


This will reduce the need for them to relieve themselves outside, making your job of keeping their feet to themselves easier.