Why Is My Dog Breathing So Hard? What Should I Do?

Why Is My Dog Breathing So Hard? What Should I Do?

Many different factors can cause a dog to breathe hard. Some of these causes are benign, while others may require medical attention.


Learning the causes of heavy breathing in dogs is important for determining what type of treatment is necessary.


The most common causes are exercise-induced or excitement-induced panting, hyperventilation, respiratory infections, heart problems, and anxiety.


Dogs also tend to breathe hard when they suffer from arthritis or other painful conditions.


There are many reasons why your pup might be breathing so hard! Here are some ways to treat it.

Section 1: Why is my dog breathing so hard? Section 2: How to treat heavy breathing in dogs Section 3: What are the symptoms of heavy breathing in dogs? Section 4: How can I tell what's causing my dog's panting? Section 5: What are the different types of treatment for heavy breathing in dogs? Section 6: Conclusion

Why is my dog breathing so hard?


Many different factors can cause a dog to breathe so hard. Some of these causes are benign, while others may require medical attention.


Exercise-Induced or Intense Panting When you are exercising your dog, he may be panting because he is trying to get air, and his chest is growing in size.


This extra air means he cannot take in as much oxygen as he needs, which can lead to fatigue and possible overheating. If he is panting hard, he may also be overweight.


Dogs that are overweight or obese are likely to breathe harder than healthy dogs.


How to treat heavy breathing in dogs


See your vet if you suspect your dog has an upper respiratory infection (URI). Your vet can recommend medications, check for ear infections, and provide other treatment.


There are many natural treatments for URI, and you can find out more about what you can use in the clip above.


If your dog suffers from exercise-induced panting, you may need to stop exercise for a period of time to allow the problem to settle down before going back to it.


If your dog suffers from heart problems, it’s important to make sure your dog gets the right amount of exercise each day.


Some dogs just can’t tolerate intense exercise, and it’s best not to force your dog to do anything he’s not happy with.


What are the symptoms of heavy breathing in dogs?


There are three main types of hyperventilation:


Exercise-induced panting This is a normal response to exercise. When a dog runs, jumps, or plays sports, his or her heart beats faster, making the dog more alert.


This increased heart rate reduces the amount of oxygen being delivered to the dog's body.


Exercise-induced panting occurs when the dog's muscles tire out and there is not enough oxygen to their lungs. It also occurs during stressful times, such as when your dog is tied up for hours at a time.


When dogs are tied up, they cannot exercise their hind legs to get oxygen into their lungs. Their heart rate is not as fast.


Hyperventilation caused by exercise-induced panting is not a cause for concern.


How can I tell what's causing my dog's panting?


Several ways to tell if your dog is panting too much include:


sucking in air through the mouth jaw trembles a fast or irregular heartbeat nodding.


Breathing in this way can be a sign of:


Exercise-Induced Panting When a dog works out too hard, the heart gets tired and takes a break.


The dog can then breathe through its mouth to provide some extra oxygen.


This type of panting can be hard to control and make a dog feel stressed. It's best to exercise only with an experienced dog trainer.


This breathing is also an unhealthy condition that can lead to hyperventilation and serious breathing problems.


Canine Heart Problems Panting may be related to a problem with the heart or the cardiovascular system.


What are the different types of treatment for heavy breathing in dogs?


Dogs may need some or all of these treatments:


Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) Cognitive Behavior Therapy is a specialized form of behavior modification that teaches your dog to handle stressful situations in a different way.


CBT helps dogs learn that the things they can’t control can be managed and even experienced as fun or positive.


Ruptures of the thyroid gland The thyroid gland regulates the body’s metabolism and is responsible for producing the hormones that control the body’s function and metabolism.


A ruptured thyroid gland can cause hyperactivity, excessive eating, weight gain, increased urination, panting, anxiety, tremors, sleep disturbance, increased heart rate and difficulty breathing.


Thyroid damage can also cause muscle tremors and loss of coordination.


Conclusion


Your dog's panting is likely normal, especially if he or she also appears to be doing well otherwise.


However, if your dog is panting regularly and showing other signs of distress, it's time to take him or her to the vet.