Why Do Dogs Shake Their Toys? The Answer Will Surprise You

Why Do Dogs Shake Their Toys? The Answer Will Surprise You

You’ve probably seen your dog shake a toy before. Usually, the shaking means that they want to play with it. But why do dogs shake their toys?


Dogs shake their toys for a variety of reasons. One possibility is that the dog is simply playing with it and shaking it to make noise, break off any pieces of plastic or fuzz, and to keep the toy alive in their minds. Another possibility is that they might be trying to get your attention in order to play.


Other times, they might be attempting to bury their toy in your carpet or couch cushions to hide it from other animals or humans; this behavior may also be related to survival instincts.


Whatever the reason, shaking a toy can sometimes lead to injury such as spinal cord damage if not done correctly. Here are some tips on how you can shake a toy safely and teach your dog better shaking habits!

 

Section 1: Why do dogs shake their toys? Section 2: What does shaking a toy mean for dogs? Section 3: How can we tell what a dog wants? Section 4: How to stop your dog from shaking their toy?

Why do dogs shake their toys?


Dogs shake their toys for a variety of reasons, including:

  • To dislodge loose pieces of plastic or wool that are stuck to the ball or the sides of the toy.
  • To remove small particles from inside the toy, like fur or fuzz. To mix the smell of the toy with their own scent.
  • To get your attention.
  • To perform a quick gesture to their hind legs and tail to remind you that they are there.
  • To get their toys stuck in objects and otherwise avoid being caught by you. To perform a quick gesture to their hind legs and tail to remind you that they are there.
  • To mix the smell of their toys with their own scent. If their toy doesn’t work right.

What does shaking a toy mean for dogs?


To start, let’s take a look at the difference between shaking a toy and playing with it. While playing with a toy can be a fun and loving experience, it often goes beyond playful.


We have the impression that dogs shake their toys just to play, when in fact, a few things have been proven to actually cause them to shake.


The "play" isn’t actually fun to them — it’s a way to release energy and have fun with their owner. Instead of shaking the toy to rid themselves of that energy, your dog is actually doing it because it’s fun to them!


How can we tell what a dog wants?


You can tell what your dog wants by observing their facial expressions while they are shaking a toy.


Dogs that are giving you a very serious expression or look like they are in pain are going to need you to make some kind of command such as “Leave it,” “Drop it,” or, “Stop!” to stop the shaking.


Other dogs may simply be bored and like to see how long they can hold onto the toy, so they will keep shaking it for as long as they can.


Walking the dog and training your dog The next time your dog wants to shake a toy and you don’t know why, you can follow these simple steps to help determine the underlying reason.


Try to engage your dog in play, games, and training that is more interactive.


How to stop your dog from shaking their toy?


Before you start your exercise session, take a few minutes to work with your dog on perfecting a good shake.


First, explain to your dog that it’s not acceptable to shake the toy unless you want to play with it.


Be sure to model your hand movements, showing your dog that shaking a toy is unacceptable and can lead to injury if not done correctly.


After you are confident that your dog understands, you can start working on perfecting a shake.


This is your chance to get your dog used to the idea that you will stop shaking a toy if he does it inappropriately.


Be sure to work on the target toy, the table, and the living room, but be careful not to scare your dog or make it impossible to work with him on this.


The basic form of a shake is a straight arm, but you can train it any way you want.